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Updated: Dec 3, 2020

Since the lockdown began in March the theatre industry has experienced many lows including many redundancies, theatres falling into administration and an ‘it’s a little too late’ £1.57bn support package from the Government. However, one high that we have had from lockdown is the accessibility to theatre at home.


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The following is a non-exhaustive list of possible ways in which performers and backstage crews can keep working on some projects. It is true that, in most cases, it may be hard to make money out of these projects, let alone making a living. However, working on something that allows them to put their skills at work may still be a worthy investment for workers in the performing arts sectors. The fundamental factor will be to partner with friends or colleagues who could provide different skills from yours.


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Updated: Dec 3, 2020

At the beginning of 2020, a dream of mine came true. In January, I started a job as a facilitator as part of a theatre company. In my previous blogs posts ‘The power of art’, I glazed over the positive impacts I saw our work have on different groups within the community. Through this post, I’ll be focusing on the positive and negatives of working as part of a theatre company. Before starting in my role, I had no previous work experience working within a theatre company. Henceforth, I had no expectations of what to expect. The theatre company I worked with consisted of three members. None of us had worked together, nor had experience working as part of a theatre company. We were informed we would be facilitating workshops in different groups through society and then left to our own devices.


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